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Comments
  1. Thanx for pointing out what I’ve been doing right in songwriting as well as
    things I need to work on. I finally realized that when I use those phrasing
    devices in riffs, solos and lead lines, they jump out and make an otherwise
    mediocre line boogie.

  2. One of my favourite songs has a guitar intro that I originally wrote for
    horns, and the guitar solo is pretty much the bass guitar part from a
    different part of the song. The different way of phrasing these parts makes
    them stand out from my usual directionless, pentatonic noodlings. Try some
    exotic scales or synthetic modes, so that your fingers aren’t going where
    instinct takes them. Likewise, using an open tuning will make your brain
    have to work in a different way than usual.

  3. creativeguitarstudio

    Thank you for taking the time to write such kind words. If you went to
    Musicians Institute you’ve certainly got the foundation to be the best
    you’re capable of! Take care. – Andrew

  4. The problem is instinct takes over. Al these scales and patterns we’ve
    learned to mechanically do without thinking become obstructive, so you need
    to “break your programming”, so to speak. John Lennon started writing on
    the piano because he found himself continually going back to the same
    instinctive concepts when trying to compose on the guitar. Joe Satriani
    advocates sticking to just one string, so that it’s just notes going up or
    down, and there’s no reliance on box shapes or positions.

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